P1           Title of program: Computational Electromagnetics

 

Program director: P.M. van den Berg

 

Name of group and faculty: Laboratory of Electromagnetic Research, ITS

 

Names of present permanent staff participants:

P.M. van den Berg (HL)     (0.4 fte) 

B.J. Kooij (UHD)  (0.4 fte) 

M.D. Verweij (UHD)           (0.4 fte) 

R.F. Remis (UD)                   (0.6 fte) 

N.V. Budko (UD) (0.6 fte) 

 

Number of currently participating temporary staff members: 3

 

Program objectives, relevance and methods adopted:

-     Objectives: Development of novel methods and approaches in computational electromagnetics, including analytical techniques and numerical algorithms, covering electromagnetic (acoustic, elastodynamic) radiation, propagation, scattering and imaging.

-     Relevance: Major applications are: radar (shallow subsurface imaging and plasma diagnostics), geophysics (low-frequency methods, seismic exploration), medical (microwave and optical diagnostics, hyperthermia), optics (modeling of photonic devices and near-field inverse scattering), electromagnetic compatibility (interference in electronic devices and antenna systems), and industry (electromagnetic forming, corrosion detection, etc.).

-     Methods adopted: Analytical methods involving complex-domain representations for the Green's functions of planar media and explicit time-domain solutions. Numerical algorithms for the efficient solution of local (based on differential formulation) and global (based on integral formulation) equations of electromagnetics, including specifically designed iterative schemes. Nonlinear optimization and regularization methods suitable for large-scale inverse scattering problems.

 

Cooperation and relation to research elsewhere:

Research schools: Center for Technical Geoscience; Netherlands Research Centre for Integrated Solid Earth Sciences; IRCTR.

Industry: Schlumberger-Doll Research (USA); Petroleum Geo-services, Oslo/Houston; T&A Radar, Amsterdam; Shell Research SRTCA, Amsterdam.

 

Other main research themes ("speerpunten") in which the group intends to participate:

Earth: observation, utilization, ecology and engineering.

 

Computer resources employed: Plans for a Beowulf cluster.

 

Contributions to BSc and MSc curricula:

-     Participation in 2 courses on the fundamentals of electric fields and waves in BSc program Electrical Engineering

-     Participation in 7 courses on the fundamentals and the application of electromagnetic, acoustic and elastodynamic fields and waves in MSc program Telecommunication:

-     ET4004 "Electromagnetic radiation, scattering and imaging"

-     ET4010 "Imaging and inverse scattering"

-     ET4012 "Electromagnetic compatibility in telecommunications"

-     ET4159 "Electromagnetic waveguides"

-     ET4160 "Acoustic and elastodynamic waves"

-     ET4162 "Computational electromagnetics. A"

-     ET4163 "Computational electromagnetics. B"

 

Duration of the program: indefinite

 

Research input realized in 1997-2001, total:

Permanent staff: 13.2 fte;

temporary staff, internal funding: 10.7 fte;

temporary staff, external funding: 13.3 fte;

 

Research input foreseen in 2002-2010, per year:

Permanent staff: 2.4 fte;

temporary staff, internal funding: 1 fte;

temporary staff, external funding: 3 fte.


P2           Title of program: Numerical algorithms and applications

 

Program director: P. Wesseling

 

Name of group and faculty: Numerical Analysis, ITS

 

Names of present permanent staff participants:

P. Wesseling (HL)               (0.7 fte)

C.W Oosterlee (UHD)        (0.6 fte)

A. Segal (UHD)                   (0.1 fte)

C. Vuik (UHD)                      (0.6 fte)

F.J. Vermolen (UD)              (0.6 fte)

                              

Number of currently participating temporary staff members: 5

 

Program objectives, relevance and methods adopted:

-     Objectives: To make innovative contributions to scientific computing techniques, especially numerical algorithms, and to monitor and profit from progress made elsewhere, and to contribute to transfer of technology to industry in this area. Our research has an interdisciplinary flavour, and is application-oriented.

-     Relevance: Application of computational fluid dynamics in industry and environmental science; materials science; reservoir engineering; tribotechnology; hydraulics; nonlinear elasticity; geophysics.

-     Methods adopted: Concentration on applications involving partial differential equations.

Applications are mainly in computational fluid dynamics, but we also cooperate in projects in other fields, mentioned above. Knowledge transfer by giving postgraduate courses and participation in interdisciplinary projects. Making software available to outside users by Internet (freely) and via a spin-off company (SEPRAN code), giving out licenses (DeFT code), and by co-development of engineering codes (SWAN, HOMOG, SIMALEX).

 

Website: ta.twi.tudelft.nl/users/wesseling

 

Cooperation and relation to research elsewhere:

Research schools: J.M. Burgers Center

Other: Shell SIEP, Philips NatLab, ALCOA, CORUS, TNO-TPD, SEPRA Engineering Consultants, various groups in TUD, Delft Hydraulics, RIKZ, GMD (Bonn).

 

Other main research themes ("speerpunten") in which the group intends to participate: None

 

Computer resources employed: LINUX cluster

 

Contributions to BSc and MSc curricula:

-     Participation in numerical analysis courses in various BSc programs.

-     Anticipated participation in courses on numerical analysis and scientific computing in prospective MSc program in Applied Mathematics.

 

Duration of the program: indefinite

 

Research input realized in 1996-2001, total:

Permanent staff: 9.6 fte;

temporary staff, internal funding: 0.5 fte;

temporary staff, external funding: 18.7 fte.

 


Research input foreseen in 2001-2010
, per year:

Permanent staff: 2.6 fte, increasing to 3.7 fte

temporary staff, internal funding: 0.5 fte;

temporary staff, externa lfunding: 5.5fte.

 


P3           Title of program: Large Scale Systems

 

Program director: A.W Heemink

 

Name of group and faculty: Mathematical Physics, ITS

 

Names of present permanent staff participants:

A.W Heemink (HL)             (0.4 fte)

K. Dekker (UD)                    (0.2 fte)

H.X. Lin (UHD)                    (0.4 fte)

P. Wilders (UHD)                (0.4 fte)

                              

Number of currently participating temporary staff members: 6

 

Program objectives, relevance and methods adopted:

-     Objectives: Mathematical modeling of physical phenomena using partial differential equations. The focus of the research is the development and analysis of efficient numerical algorithms for solving large scale simulation problems. The research is driven by real life flow and transport applications.

-     Relevance: Mathematical modeling has become a very important tool for solving complicated technical and environmental problems. Central applications studied in the program are water level forecasting systems, modeling of coastal transport processes and air pollution modeling.

-     Methods adopted: Data assimilation in computational fluid dynamics, efficient Kalman filtering algorithms, stochastic differential equations for substance transport modeling, unstructured hybrid finite volumes for substance transport applications, domain decomposition, parallel computing.

 

Website: ta.twi.tudelft.nl/

 

Cooperation and relation to research elsewhere:

Research schools: J.M. Burgers Center

Other: Rijkswaterstaat, WL Delft Hydraulics, KNMI, RIVM, TNO-NITG, TNO-MEP, Shell.

 

Other main research themes ("speerpunten") in which the group intends to participate:

Water, Earth

 

Computer resources employed: NWO PC cluster, PC cluster of the Section

 

Contributions to BSc and MSc curricula:

-     Participation in the courses "Continuummechanica (wi2090)", "Modelbouw II (wi2089), "Practische studie (wi4072)" in BSc program in Applied Mathematics.

-     Anticipated participation in courses on fluid dynamics and stochastic differential equations in prospective MSc program in Applied Mathematics.

 

Duration of the program: Indefinite

 

Research input realized in 1995-2000 total:

Permanent staff: 8 fte;

temporary staff, internal funding: 8 fte;

temporary staff, external funding: 25 fte;

 

Research input foreseen in 2001-2010, per year:

Permanent staff: 1.4 fte;

temporary staff, internal funding: 1 fte;

temporary staff, external funding: 5 fte;

 

 

 


P4           Title of program: Engineering Mechanics

 

Program director: R. de Borst

 

Name of group and faculty: Engineering Mechanics, LR

 

Names of present permanent staff participants:

R. de Borst (HL)                  (0.5 fte)

M.A. Gutierrez (UHD)        (0.5 fte)

S.J. Hulshoff (UHD)            (0.7 fte)

A.S.J. Suiker (UHD)            (0.7 fte)

 

Number of currently participating temporary staff members: 5 PhD students, 1 postdoc

               

Program objectives, relevance and methods adopted:

-     Objectives: Development of modern, innovative computational techniques to analyse materials and structures and the interaction between structures and flows and relating them to results obtained with sophisticated experimental equipment.

-     Relevance: The group provides pioneering fundamental computational research on failure mechanics of solids and fluid-structure interaction. This fundamental research is used to conduct further fundamental and applied research by other university groups.

-     Methods adopted: A coupling is pursued between advanced computational tools like the finite element method, sophisticated experimentation and thorough knowledge of mechanics. Parallel processing provides the required computing power to carry out the simulations within reasonable time spans.

 

Cooperation and relation to research elsewhere:

Research schools: Engineering Mechanics; J.M. Burgers Center; Aerodynamics (TUD/LR); Aerospace Materials (TUD/LR).

 

Other main research themes ("speerpunten") in which the group intends to participate:

Materials Science

 

Computer resources employed: SGI Origin 2000

 

Contributions to BSc and MSc curricula:

-     Participation in 3 courses on Engineering Mechanics in BSc program in Aerospace Engineering.

-     Participation in 1 course on Aeroelasticity in MSc program in Aerospace Engineering.

-     Anticipated participation in courses on Computational ans Stochastic Mechanics in prospective MSc program in Aerospace Engineering.

 

Duration of the program: indefinite

 

Research input realized in 1995-2001, per year:

Permanent staff: 1.7 fte;

temporary staff, internal funding: 3.7 fte;

temporary staff, external funding: 3.9 fte.

 

Research input foreseen in 2002-2010, per year:

Permanent staff: 2.5 fte;

temporary staff, internal funding: 2.5 fte;

temporary staff, external funding: 6 fte.

 


 

P5           Title of program: Computational Aerodynamics

 

Program director:  B. Koren           

 

Name of group and faculty: Aerodynamics, LR

 

Names of present permanent staff participants:

H. Bijl (UHD)                        (0.4 fte)

M.I. Gerritsma (UD)            (0.4 fte)

B. Koren (HL, part-time)     (0.1 fte)

 

Number of currently participating temporary staff members: 3

 

Program objectives, relevance and methods adopted:

-     Objectives: Efficient and accurate numerical simulation of aerodynamic flows in aerospace applications, preferably in cooperation with other disciplines, such as structural mechanics or electromagnetism.

-     Relevance: Computational aerodynamics is of still growing importance to aerospace engineering. Of particular relevance for the coming years is the still expanding cooperation with

-     structural mechanics (fluid-structure interactions and flow control, `smart wings');

-     structural thermodynamics (efficient cooling of hypersonic reentry vehicles);

-     acoustics (more quiet aircraft);

-     electromagnetism (improved robustness of satellites against solar wind, bringing to practice magnetohydrodynamic propulsion for deep-space missions);

-     mathematics (elimination of uncertainties from turbulent fluid-flow solutions through filtering techniques, multidisciplinary aircraft and spacecraft design through genetic algorithms, etc.).

All these cooperations are expected to yield more than the sum of the separate disciplines.

-     Methods adopted:

-     State-of-the-art numerical methods for solving aerodynamic-flow problems governed by partial differential equations: discontinuous Galerkin, least-squares spectral element, level-set, two-fluid capturing, multigrid, grid adaptation, efficient time-integration, and inverse methods;

-     Coupling techniques for fluid-flow and other (e.g, structural mechanics) equations;

-     Filtering techniques for modeling uncertainties (in, e.g., turbulence) and model-adaptation techniques.

 

Website: www.hsa.lr.tudelft.nl

 

Cooperation and relation to research elsewhere:

Research schools: J.M. Burgers Center, Engineering Mechanics (TUD/LR), Stability and Control (TUD/LR). Other: CWI, NLR, Von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics, ESA-ESTEC, NUMECA, University of Michigan, Virginia Tech, ICASE, NASA Langley Research Center.

 

Other main research themes ("speerpunten") in which the group intends to participate: None

 

Computer resources employed:

15 Unix workstations and 5 Linux PCs in own group, Cray-T3E at HAPAC, and SGI Origin-3800 at SARA, Amsterdam.
Contributions to BSc and MSc curricula:

-     Participation in 4 courses on aerodynamics in BSc program in Aerospace Engineering.

-     Anticipated participation in 13 courses on aerodynamics of which 3 on computational aerodynamics (ae4-150, ae4-151, ae4-152) in prospective MSc program in Aerospace Engineering.

 

Duration of the program: indefinite

 

Research input realized in 1995-2001, per year:

Permanent staff: 1.0 - 2.0 fte;

temporary staff, internal funding: 1.0 fte;

temporary staff, external funding: 0.0 fte;

 

Research input foreseen in 2002-2010, per year:

Permanent staff: 2.1 - 3.0 fte;

temporary staff, internal funding: 1.0 fte;

temporary staff, external funding: 4.0 fte;

 
P6           Title of program: Computational Turbulence Dynamics

 

Program director: F.T.M. Nieuwstadt

 

Name of group and faculty: Fluid Dynamics, OCP

 

Names of present permanent staff participants:

F.T.M. Nieuwstad (HL)                      (0.5 fte)

B.J. Boersma (UHD)                           (0.7 fte)

M.B.J.M Pourquie (UHD) (0.2 fte)

R. Uittenbogaard (UHD)                    (0.1 fte)

 

Number of currently participating temporary staff members: 6

 

Program objectives, relevance and methods adopted:

-     Objectives: To perform research on computational turbulence dynamics and to exploit the results in engineering applications. To improve understanding and control of turblence by computational methods.

-     Relevance: Drag reduction, noise abatement, modeling of turbulence in connection with chemical reactions and multiphase flows, stability or mobility of bed material and bed forms in rivers and estuaries.

-     Methods adopted: Large-eddy and direct numerical simulation of turbulence; efficient parallel computing. Comparison with (in-house) experiments.

 

Website:  www.ahd.tudelft.nl

 

Cooperation and relation to research elsewhere:

Research school: J.M. Burgers Center

Other: TMR-EU Network on LES of complex industrial processes (U. of Surrey, U. of  Munich, U. of Karlsruhe, U. of Grenoble, EDF France), TMR-EU Network on mixing (Imperial College, danish Technical University, Ecole Normale Superieure Paris), TNO-PML, RUL-LUMC.

 

Other main research themes ("speerpunten") in which the group intends to participate:

Sustainable industrial processes

 

Computer resources employed:

Local Beowulf cluster for pre- and postprocessing, SARA-NCF TERAS

 

Contributions to BSc and MSc curricula:

Contributions to:

-     BSc Mechanical engineering (OCP)

-     MSc Solid and Fluid Mechanics (OCP)

-     MSc Process and Energy (OCP)

 

Duration of the program: indefinite

 

Research input realized in 1996-2001, average per year:

Permanent staff: 1.5 fte;

temporary staff, internal funding: 1 fte;

temporary staff, external funding: 5 fte.

 

Research input foreseen in 2001-2010, per year:

Permanent staff: 1.5 fte, increasing to 2 fte;

temporary staff, internal funding: 1 fte;

temporary staff, external funding: 6 fte.

 


P7           Title of program: Structural Optimization & Computational Mechanics

 

Program director: A. van Keulen

 

Name of group and faculty: Structural Optimization & Computational Mechanics, OCP

 

Names of present permanent staff participants:

A. van Keulen (HL)                            (0.4 fte)

J. Booij (UD)                                        (0.3 fte)

J. van der Linden (UD)                       (0.2 fte)

                              

Number of currently participating temporary staff members: 6

 

Program objectives, relevance and methods adopted:

-     Objectives: Development of efficient and versatile techniques for analysis, design and optimization of structures, containing multiple length scales and different physical domains. These techniques are being developed and demonstrated for micro-electrical-mechanical systems (MEMS) and biomedical systems.

-     Relevance: An ongoing trend towards complex multidisciplinary systems can be observed. Typical examples are MEMS and biomedical systems. For these highly multidisciplinary systems only competitive designs can be realized if efficient analysis and optimization techniques are available. These techniques are required in industrial as well as in scientific environments.

-     Methods adopted: Numerical modelling techniques, particularly based on finite elements, are intensively used. Both classical and nonclassical continuum formulations serve as starting points. For optimization and design purposes, design sensitivity analysis is one of the main research activities. For optimization both "brute-force" methods as well as more sophisticated (gradient-based) optimization schemes are being employed and developed. Both shape and topology optimization techniques are being used. Most algorithms used and developed benefit from parallel computing.

 

Website: socm.wbmt.tudelft.nl

 

Cooperation and relation to research elsewhere:

Research school: Engineering Mechanics.

Other: DSM Research, Airbus Hamburg, DLR Stuttgart, Univ. of Florida, Eramus Un., TUE, DIMES.

 

Other main research themes ("speerpunten") in which the group intends to participate:

Mechatronics and Microsystems.

 

Computer resources employed: Linux cluster

 

Contributions to BSc and MSc curricula:

Participation in courses in MSc programs Solid and Fluid Mechanics, Biomedical Engineering

 

Duration of the program: indefinite

 

Research input realized in 1995-2000:

Not applicable: new group.

 

Research input foreseen in 2001-2010, per year:  

Permanent staff: 1.4 fte;

temporary staff, internal funding: 1 fte;

temporary staff, external funding: 4 fte.

 


           

P8 Title of program: Domain Decomposition and Dynamic Substructuring for HPC in Structural

   Dynamics

 

Program director: D.J. Rixen

 

Name of group and faculty: Engineering Mechanics/Dynamics, OCP

 

Names of present permanent staff participants:

D.J. Rixen (HL)                     (0.4 fte)

                              

Number of currently participating temporary staff members: 1

 

Program objectives, relevance and methods adopted:

-     Objectives: To develop numerical tools that allow fast and reliable dynamical analysis of large/multiphysical models representing complex structural systems. In particular, to propose efficient parallel solvers for structural problems and reduction methods for dynamic analysis.

-     Relevance: New materials, such as piezoelectric ceramics, and novel mechanical structures, such as Micro-Electro-Mechanical systems (MEMS), require modern dynamic analysis to take into account the coupling between different physical fields, treated separately in earlier days. Tackling multi-physical problems is one of the essential challenges underlying the development of new analysis tools and innovative design approaches in mechanical dynamics. Providing accurate reduced model and solvers for large models is primordial when dynamic phenomena of complex systems are analyzed.

-     Methods adopted: Development of novel numerical methods and advanced algorithms for efficient computing and testing. The procedures developed are based on domain decomposition and dynamic substructuring in order to provide accurate low order models for fast analysis and control.

-     Applications: Biodynamics/vibration simulation of lower-back; experimental identification of non-linear dynamical systems; dynamic substructuring techniques (e.g. Ariane 5 rocket, airbus models); selfaligning surfaces under condition of partial mechanical contact; multibody systems with flexible elements; electromechanical analysis of MEMS and inkjet printheads; dynamic analysis of quasi-cyclic symmetric and quasi-periodic structures.

 

Cooperation and relation to research elsewhere:

Research schools: Engineering Mechanics

Other: University of Colorado at Boulder, LM2S group at University Paris VI, ESTEC, European Master in Modelisation of Continuum (Saigon, Vietnam), Erasmus University.

 

Other main research themes ("speerpunten") in which the group intends to participate:

Mechatronics and Microsystems

 

Computer resources employed: PC's

 

Contributions to BSc and MSc curricula:

BSc (OCP):

-     Dynamica A (wb1113)

-     Dynamica 2-1, 2-2 (wb1211,wb1215)

-     Dynamica 3 (wb1308)

MSc programs Control Engineering and Mechatronics and Fluid and Solids mechanics (OCP):

-     Engineering Dynamics (wb1418)

-     Multibody Dynamics A (wb1310)

-     Multibody Dynamics B (wb1413)

-     Numerical Methods for Dynamics (wb1416)

-     Non-linear vibrations (wb1412)

-     Fluid-Structure interaction (wb1417)

-     Engineering Dynamics and Mechanisms (wb1419)

-     Experimental Mechanics (wb1406)

 

Duration of the program: indefinite

 


 

Research input realized in 2000-2001:

Permanent staff:  0.5 fte;

temporary staff, internal funding: 0 fte;

temporary staff, external funding: 0 fte;

 

Research input foreseen in 2001-2010, per year:

Permanent staff: 0.4 fte;

temporary staff, internal funding: 1 fte;

temporary staff, external funding: 2 fte;


P9           Title of program: Computational Mechanics of Materials

 

Program director: L.J. Sluys

 

Name of group and faculty: Structural Mechanics, CiTG

 

Names of present permanent staff participants:

L.J. Sluys (UHD)                                 (0.7 fte)

H. Askes (UD)                                     (0.7 fte)

G.N. Wells (UD)                                  (0.7 fte)

M. Stroeven (UD)                               (0.2 fte)

                              

Number of currently participating temporary staff members: 6

 

Program objectives, relevance and methods adopted:

-     Objectives: The computational analysis of failure in civil engineering materials and structures (infrastructure and buildings) under static, dynamic and impact loading conditions.

Not only the traditional civil engineering materials, such as concrete, steel and soils are investigated, but also advanced materials with high performance properties, such as fibre-reinforced materials, polymers and laminates are subject of research.

-     Relevance: The ever increasing complexity of engineering problems is placing enormous demands on the computational tools available to engineers. Daring civil engineering projects with sophisticated civil engineering  materials are planned for the future. For safe and economically viable modelling, computational tools are   needed to analyse these complex problems. In this project a new category of computational techniques will be developed for the analysis of structural materials in civil engineering structures.

-     Methods adopted: For the computational analysis of (high performance) civil engineering materials a solid micro-mechanical framework is employed. This will be embedded in a multiscale computational strategy. The relevant coupled hydro-mechanical, thermo-mechanical and chemo-mechanical processes will be incorporated in the formulation.

The algorithms must be adapted for the nonlinear analysis of large scale structures on massive parallel computers and efficient adaptive schemes must be developed.

 

Website: www.mechanics.citg.tudelft.nl

 

Cooperation and relation to research elsewhere:

Research School: Engineering Mechanics

National: DIOC-10, Microlab,  Delft Cluster, Rijkswaterstaat, TNO-PML

International:  Airforce Research Lab. (USA),  INSA Lyon, VUB Brussels, KU Leuven

 

Other main research themes ("speerpunten") in which the group intends to participate:

Materials Science

 

Computer resources employed: 2 SG (R200) four-processor compute servers

 

Contributions to BSc and MSc curricula:

Participation in 2 courses  on Structural Mechanics in BSc program Civil Engineering

MSc program Civil Engineering: course: Computational Methods in Nonlinear Solid Mechanics, and two courses on Finite Elements

 

Duration of the program: indefinite


Research input realized in 1995-2000
, per year:

Permanent staff: 1.0 fte

temporary staff, internal funding: 0.0 fte

temporary staff, external funding: 3.0 fte

 

Research input foreseen in 2001-2010, per year:

Permanent staff: 2.3 fte

temporary staff, internal funding: 1.0 fte

temporary staff, external funding: 5.0 fte

 


P10        Title of program: Mechanics of Structural Systems

 

Program director: A. Scarpas

 

Name of group and faculty: Structural Mechanics, CiTG

 

Names of present permanent staff participants:

J. Blaauwendraad (HL)       (0.4 fte)

A. Vrouwenvelder (HL)      (0.2 fte)

A. Scarpas (UHD)               (0.5 fte)

P. Hoogenboom (UD)         (0.2 fte)

C. Kasbergen (TO)              (0.6 fte)

                              

Number of currently participating temporary staff members: 9

 

Program objectives, relevance and methods adopted:

-     Objectives: Development of innovative, mechanics-based solutions to national and global civil engineering challenges. Integration of mechanics with the construction/materals oriented disciplines in civil engineering.

-     Relevance: Accomodation of population concentrations near river delta areas (up to 75% of world population expected) requires significant advances in understanding and prediction of response of constructions built on weak soils. Sustainability of material resources requires optimization of existing and development of more durable materials. Our research in structural mechanics contributes to these developments, and benefits national construction industry in their global competition.

-      Methods adopted: Analytic and computational structural mechanics techniques (new finite elements for specific geometries and boundary conditions, improved solution algorithms, mechanics-based non-destructive testing methods, models and methods for coupled and multi-scale problems). Validation and verification in (inter-)national cooperation. In-house software development: CAPA-2D, INSAP, SPanCAD.

-     Applications: Soil structure interaction, surface subsidence, slope instability, liquefaction, non-destructive testing (KOAC, CROW), smart building materials like polymer modified asphalt (Ooms, Shell, Fina), glass-fibre reinforcement (Bay Mills, Cold Bond), drainage materials (Akzo-Nobel), lightweight roads (DWW, Stybenex), foundation micro-piles (DWW, Geo-Delft), earthquake engineering, pipeline engineering (GasUnie), bridge engineering (Bouw Dienst RWS, TNO).

 

Website: www.mechanics.citg.tudelft.nl

 

Cooperation and relation to research elsewhere:

Research School: Structural Engineering

Within TUD/CiTG: Sections Concrete Structures, Steel and Timber Structures, Soil Engineering, Road and Railway Engineering.

National: Delft Cluster, CROW, CUR, TNO, GasUnie, Rijkswaterstaat, Shell, Akzo-Nobel, GeoDelft, Ooms..

International: U. of Nottingham, NTU Athens, U. of Texas (Austin), U. Of Liege, U. of Stellenbosch, U. of Arizona (Tucson), Fina, BRRC, Purdue U.

 

Other main research themes ("speerpunten") in which the group intends to participate:

Materials Science, Mobility

 

Computer resources employed:

6 Unix workstations, several high-end PCs and TUD supercomputer.

 

Contributions to BSc and MSc curricula:

Basic studies: 5 courses

Final studies: 9 courses

 

Duration of the program: indefinite

 

Research input realized in 1995-2000:

Permanent staff:  2.0 fte;

temporary staff, internal funding: 2 fte;

temporary staff, external funding:  5 fte.

 

Research input foreseen in 2001-2010, per year:  

Permanent staff:  2.4fte;

temporary staff, internal funding: 2 fte;

temporary staff, external funding:  7fte.


P11        Title of program: Simulation of environmental flow systems

 

Program director: G.S. Stelling

 

Name of group and faculty: Environmental fluid mechanics, CiTG

 

Names of present permanent staff participants:

G.S. Stelling (HL)                 (0.2 fte)

L.H. Holthuijsen (UHD)                     (0.2 fte)

M. Zijlema (UD)                                  (0.4 fte)

J. Pietrzak (UHD)                 (0.5 fte)

R.J. Labeur (UD)                                 (0.4 fte)  

                              

Number of currently participating temporary staff members: 2

 

Program objectives, relevance and methods adopted:

-     Objectives: The development of validated computational simulation tools for free surface flows. Examples are:

SWAN: A code incorporating a large scale short wave model; direct simulation of free surface waves; 1D/2D model integration for inudation simulation of rural and urban areas on computer clusters

-     Relevance: Environmental decision making; flood prediction and control. 

-     Methods adopted: Mathematical and numerical models: unstructured staggered schemes, shock capturing methods, finite element methods, scalable parallel algorithms

 

Websites: swan.ct.tudelft.nl/home.htm

(www.hisinfo.nl/2_hisalgemeen/2b_2overstromingsmodule.htm)

 

Cooperation and relation to research elsewhere:

Research school: J.M. Burgers Center

Other: Delft Hydraulics, Rijkswaterstaat, US Office of Naval Research (ONR).

 

Other main research themes ("speerpunten") in which the group intends to participate: Water

 

Computer resources employed: Workstations, Beowulf cluster.

 

Contributions to BSc and MSc curricula:

6 coarses Bsc and 7 in Msc program

 

Duration of the program: indefinite

 

Research input realized in 1995-2000, per year:

Permanent staff:  4.3 fte;

temporary staff, internal funding: 7 fte;

 

Research input foreseen in 2001-2010, per year:  

Permanent staff: 4 fte;

temporary staff: 5 fte;


P12        Title of program: Computational combustion, heat and mass transfer

 

Program director: K. Hanjalic

 

Name of group and faculty: Thermal and Fluids Science, TNW

 

Names of present permanent staff participants:

K. Hanjalic (HL)                                  (0.2 fte)

D. Roekaerts (HL)                               (0.05 fte) 

H. Jonker (UD)                                    (0.4 fte)

S. Kenjeres (KNAW Fellow)             (0.8 fte)

                              

Number of currently participating temporary staff members: 8

 

Program objectives, relevance and methods adopted:

-     Objectives: Transport phenomena (convection, diffusion, radiation), in combination with combustion and other chemical reactions play an essential role in energy conversion and process technologies, in bio-systems, in environmental science and astro- and geophysics. The objective of this program is to generate a better  fundamental understanding of these phenomena, to master their control and optimization, and to generate knowledge for new technologies.

-     Relevance: Global sustainability, energy efficiency, process intensification, renewable energy conversion, sustainable industrial processes.

-     Methods adopted: Multi-scale modeling (turbulence, micro-mixing, from flame fronts to industrial equipment scale); computational fluid dynamics (RANS, Large Eddy Simulations, Direct Numerical Simulations) employing massively parallelized supercomputers; comparison of computations with (in-house) measurements.

 

Website: www.ws.tn.tudelft.nl

 

Cooperation and relation to research elsewhere:

Research schools: J.M. Burgers Center

Industry: Shell, TNO/TPD, TNO/PML, Philips, Corus, AVL(Austria).

Academia: Imperial College (prof. Leschziner), UMIST (profs. Launder and Laurence), U-Leuven
(prof. vd Bulck), SANDIA (prof. Barlow).

 

Other main research themes ("speerpunten") in which the group intends to participate:

Sustainable Industrial Processes

 

Computer resources employed: workstations, Linux cluster, supercomputers.

 

Contributions to BSc and MSc curricula:

-     Participation in courses in BSc program in Applied Physics:

-     Thermodynamics

-     Classical Mechanics

-     Anticipated participation in transport phenomena realted courses in prospective MSc program in Applied Physics:

-     Advanced Thermodynamics

-     Advanced Physical Transport Phenomena

-     Turbulent Reacting Flows

-     Radiative Heat Transfer

-     Environmental Physics

 

Duration of the program: indefinite

 

Research input realized in 1995-2000, average per year:

Permanent staff:  0.65  fte; temporary staff, internal funding: 0 fte;

temporary staff, external funding: 4.5 fte.


 

Research input foreseen in 2001-2010, per year:

Permanent staff: 0.65 fte + 0.8 fte (KNAW);

temporary staff, internal funding: 0 fte;

temporary staff, external funding:  4.5 fte.

 


P13        Title of program:  Simulation of chemical processes and multiphase flows

 

Program director:  H.E.A. van den Akker

 

Name of group and faculty: Kramers Laboratorium voor Fysische Technologie, TNW

 

Names of present permanent staff participants:

J.J. Derksen (UHD)             (0.25 fte)

C.R. Kleijn (HL)                   (0.25 fte)

R.F. Mudde (HL)                 (0.25 fte)

L.M. Portela (UHD)             (0.75 fte)

                              

Number of currently participating temporary staff members: 10

 

Program objectives, relevance and methods adopted:

-     Objectives: Development of dedicated models and codes for improved design, operation, performance and controllability of chemical processes and process equipment.

-     Relevance: More sustainable, compact and efficient processes and equipment; improved product quality.

-     Methods adopted: Improving fundamental understanding of local hydrodynamics, mixing and transport phenomena, and their interaction with chemical reactions, by computational modeling (supported by detailed in-house measurements).

 

Website: kramerslab.tn.tudelft.nl

 

Cooperation and relation to research elsewhere:

Research schools: J.M. Burgers Center, OSPT (Process Technology)

Industry: Shell research (Rijswijk and Amsterdam), Dow Benelux, Dupont Central R&D (Wilmington, Delaware), DSM Research, Akzo-Nobel Chemicals Research, TNO-TPD, TNO-PML, Merck GmbH (Darmstadt), Institut Francais du Petrole (Lyon)

Academia: King's College London, Washington University, LSTM Erlangen, Clarkson University

 

Other main research themes ("speerpunten") in which the group intends to participate:

Sustainable Industrial Processes

 

Computer resources employed: Beowulf cluster

 

Contributions to BSc and MSc curricula:

BSc programs in Applied Physics and Applied Earth Sciences

MSc programs in Applied Physics, Chemical Engineering and Biochemical Engineering

 

Duration of the program: indefinite

 

Research input realized in 1995-2000, per year:

Permanent staff:  1.2 fte;

temporary staff, internal funding: 1 fte;

temporary staff, external funding: 6 fte.

 

Research input foreseen in 2001-2010, per year:

Permanent staff:  1.5 fte;

temporary staff, internal funding: 1 fte; 

temporary staff, external funding: 9 fte. 


P14        Title of program: Computational Physics

 

Program director: S.W de Leeuw

 

Name of group and faculty: DelftChemTech, TNW

 

Names of present permanent staff participants:

S.W de Leeuw (HL)            (0.4 fte)

                              

Number of currently participating temporary staff members: 6

 

Program objectives, relevance and methods adopted:

-     Objectives: The objective is to study behavior and structure-function relations in statistical-physical models, nano-composites,  complex fluids and biological systems. This involves study of complex physical processes characterized by dynamical processes spanning a vast range of length and time scales. Obtaining fundamental understanding of material behaviour and processes at atomistic and mesoscopic scales, to assist in the rational design of functional materials and processes.

-     Relevance: Inorganic and nanostructured ceramics for devices for renewableenergy; magnetic systems; colloidal suspensions, polymers.

-     Methods adopted: Multi-scale modeling; scalable parallel algorithms; (quantum) molecular dynamics simulation; (quantum) Monte Carlo simulation; lattice Boltzmann techniques, dissipative particle dynamics.

 

Website: www.cp.tn.tudelft.nl

 

Cooperation and relation to research elsewhere:

Research school:

Other:

-     DIOCs Renewable Energy, Life Science and Technology, Hydrogen Storage.

-     DFG Schwerpunktprogramme Molecular Science in Engineering.

-     Shell SIEP; Philips Natlab.

-     EU ESF-SIMU Network Bridging the time-length-scale gap in simulation.

-     CSIRO, CNRS (Orleans), USC, Northwestern Un., Monash Un. , Imperial College (London), Niigata Un. (Japan).

 

Other main research themes ("speerpunten") in which the group intends to participate:

Sustainable energy

 

Computer resources employed: Workstations, Beowulf clusters.

 

Contributions to BSc and MSc curricula:

-     Participation in 2 courses on computational science in BSc program in physics (chemistry).

-     Anticipated participation in courses on computational physics in prospective MSc programs in physics, chemistry and materials science.

 

Duration of the program: indefinite

 

Research input realized in 1995-2000, total:

Permanent staff: 3 fte;

temporary staff, internal funding: 3 fte;

temporary staff, external funding: 4 fte;


Research input foreseen in 2001-2010, per year:

Permanent staff: 0.4 fte;

temporary staff, internal funding: 4 fte;

temporary staff, external funding: 6 fte;


P15        Title of program: Computational Chemistry

 

Program director: S.T. Bromley

 

Name of group and faculty: Applied Organic Chemistry and Catalysis, DelftChemTech, TNW

 

Names of present permanent staff participants:

S.T. Bromley  (UHD)           (0.4 fte)

 

Number of currently participating temporary staff members: 4

 

Website:  www.dct.tudelft.nl/tock

 

Program objectives, relevance and methods adopted:

-     Objectives: Quantum mechanical, classical, and hybrid QM/MM simulations of catalysts: including supports (e.g. zeolites, ZnO) and active centres (e.g. transition metal clusters). Novel approaches to porous silica-based materials using molecular mechanics/dynamics simulation and QM cluster calculations:

-     predictions of stability,

-     new building blocks,

-     fundamental properties of low-dimensional silica.

-     Relevance: Understanding of properties of and performance of catalysts and catalyst supports at the elctronic/atomistic level. Design of new nanocluster-based materials for multipurpose applications, e.g. catalysis, electronic/magnetic systems. Performance prediction of as yet unsynthesised materials for applications in catalysis, gas storage, renewable energy applications.

-     Methods adopted: We are committed to high qualtity in-depth investigations using where possible parallelised code on our  (16-node) Linux cluster. We are mainly users rather than developers, but do have a strong interest in bringing together existing codes to work together for more efficient and appropriate simulations - see Chemshell development.

 

Cooperation and relation to research elsewhere:

Collaborations with The Royal Institution (UK), ICI (UK) and Shell (NL) with use and developments of Chemshell software enabling existing computational chemistry codes to be interfaced together as modules to do multi-scale modelling, e.g. QM/MM modelling. Continued links with the Cambridge University (UK) chemistry department with experimental/theoretical interpretation of slilca-supported transition metal cluster systems.

 

Other main research themes ("speerpunten") in which the group intends to participate: none

 

Computer resources employed: 16-node Linux cluster, SARA national facilities, workstations.

 

Contributions to BSc and MSc curricula:

 

Duration of the program: indefinite.

 

Research input realized in 2001:

Permanent staff: 0.4 fte;

temporary staff, internal funding: 0 fte;

temporary staff, external funding: 4 fte.

 

Research input foreseen in 2001-2010, per year:

Permanent staff: 0.4 fte;

temporary staff, external funding: 4 fte.


P16        Title of program: Nature Inspired Chemical Engineering

 

Program director: M.-O. Coppens

 

Name of group and faculty: Reactor & Catalysis Engineering, DelftChemTech, TNW

 

Names of present permanent staff participants:  M.-O. Coppens (HL)  (0.4 fte)

                              

Number of currently participating temporary staff members: 4.5

 

Program objectives, relevance and methods adopted:

-     Objectives: To better control physico-chemical processes by imposing a desired geometrical design or architecture, from the molecular to the reactor scale, in order to improve chemical reaction engineering. Development and demonstration of novel catalytic and reactor engineering concepts.

-     Relevance: Improvements in chemical reaction engineering; fluidized beds and other multiphase reactors. Design and synthesis of new hierarchical and biomimetic porous materials, and the modelling of transport phenomena in porous materials.

-     Methods adopted: We focus on patterns and symmetries appearing in nature, e.g. self-similarity and self-assembled ordered patterns, from which lessons are drawn to improve the design of porous catalysts, materials and reactors. Use of computational fluid dynamics, novel contributions to methods in computational chemistry and physics, in particular statistical mechanics (molecular dynamics, Monte-Carlo).

 

Website:  www.dct.tudelft.nl/race/research/coppens/moc.html

 

Cooperation and relation to research elsewhere:

Research schools: J.M. Burgers Center, OSPT, NIOK

Industry: Akzo, Sasol, SABIC

Academia: Yale (Prof. Mandelbrot), UC Berkeley (Prof. Bell),  Univ. Southern California (Prof. Sahimi/Tsotsis;), Chinese Academy of Sciences, Taiyuan (Prof. Li/Sun), FNDP Namur, Belgium (Prof. Su), TU Hamburg (Prof. Keil), Univ. Stuttgart (Prof. Hasse)

 

Other main research themes ("speerpunten") in which the group intends to participate: Sustainable Industrial Processes

 

Computer resources employed: workstations, supercomputers; Beowulf cluster planned

 

Contributions to BSc and MSc curricula:

-     BSc Chemical Engineering: 1st year compulsory course on the Introduction to Process Technology

-     BSc Life Science & Technology: 2nd year compulsory course on Transport (flow and diffusion) in  Living Systems, together with Prof. LAM van der Wielen MSc course on Fractals and Their Applications to Chemical Engineering

 

Duration of the program: indefinite

 

Present research input:

Permanent staff: 0.4 fte;

temporary staff, external funding: 6 fte.


Research input foreseen in 2001-2010
, per year:

Permanent staff: 0.4 fte;

temporary staff, external funding: 6 fte;

PIONIER subsidy 600 kEuro + 600kEuro over next five years.


P17        Title of program: Computational modeling of particulate flows

 

Program director: S. Luding

 

Name of group and faculty: Particle Technology, DelftChemTech, TNW

 

Names of present permanent staff participants:  S. Luding (UHD)         (0.4 fte)

                              

Number of currently participating temporary staff members: 3

 

Program objectives, relevance and methods adopted:

-     Objectives:

-     Multi-scale computational modelling of particulate flow problems.

-     Micro-scale: Molecular dynamics modelling of gas-/fluid-flows and shear-banding in solids, shock-waves, electro-spraying, granular flows, dissipative non-equilibrium flows.

-     Macro-scale: Clustering, micro-polar continuum theory, planetary and stellar ring-sytems.

-     Micro-Macro-Transition: Determination of equation of state, viscosity, heat-conductivity from discrete particle simulations, kinetic theory for multi-phase systems, phase separation/segregation.

-     Relevance: Granular flows (chemical and mechanical engineering, geotechnics, pharmaceutical industry, ...), process engineering, supersonic flows, astrophysics, electrospraying (medical drug delivery, crop-spraying in greenhouses, ...), micro-macro transition, multi-physics.

-     Methods adopted:

Molecular dynamics (MD):

-     soft-sphere: solution of coupled differential equation systems with 6N degrees of freedom, with particle number N = 2.000-50.000, neigborhood-detection algorithms (linked-cell, linked linear list), DE-solvers, (Verlet, leapfrog, predictor-corrector).

-     hard sphere: event-driven methods, with N = 10.000-2.000.000, hierarchical tree-codes for collision-event detection and parallelization.

Tools used: FORTRAN, C, C++, MATLAB, FEMLAB, MAPLE, ...

 

Cooperation and relation to research elsewhere:

Research schools: J.M. Burgers Center

Other: Leiden Un., Twente Un.; Un. of Durham; Inst. for Computer Appl., Stuttgart; DFG group "Behavior of granular media"; SFB382, SFB404 (Germany).

 

Other main research themes ("speerpunten") in which the group intends to participate:

Materials Science.

 

Computer resources employed:

LINUX cluster (7 nodes); inhomogeneous UNIX-cluster (in Stuttgart); several CRAYs.

 

Contributions to BSc and MSc curricula:

-     Course Particle Technology 1, in BSc program in Chemical Eng.

-     Course Particle Technology 1+2, in MSc program Bio-/Chemical Eng.

 

Duration of the program: 2001 - indefinite

 

Present research input: Permanent staff: 0.4 fte;

Temporary staff, external funding: 1 fte.


Research input foreseen in 2001-2010
, per year:

Permanent staff: 0.5 fte;

Temporary staff, internal funding:  0 fte;

Temporary staff, external funding: 4 fte.

 


P18        Title of program: Virtual Materials Laboratory

 

Program director: B.J. Thijsse

 

Name of group and faculty: Atomic processes at surfaces and interfaces, TNW

 

Names of present permanent staff participants:

B.J. Thijsse (HL)                  (0.5 fte)

P.F.A. Alkemade (UHD)     (0.1 fte)

J. Sietsma (UHD) (0.1 fte)

                              

Number of currently participating temporary staff members: 2

 

Program objectives, relevance and methods adopted:

-     Objectives: Understanding the atomic processes that control the properties and time evolution of materials. The challenge is mastering complexity and scale disparity. Complexity arises from inhomogeneities and nonequilibrium conditions of real materials. Scale disparity arise from the existence of different regimes in the time, space and energy scales. The concerted behavior of atoms drives the mesoscale behavior and ultimately determines the material properties and the effec of processes to which materials are subjected. Much remains to be fully understood. Computational materials science is currently producing new understanding of challenging phenomena at a high rate; we intend to partake in this development. We aim for the establishment of a Virtual Materials Science Laboratory, intended to be an expertise center for computational materials science.

-     Relevance: Optimized materials; miniaturized structures; reliability of materials in extreme conditions. Computational materials science promises great advances.

-     Methods adopted: Computational materials science. Multi-scale modeling.

Theoretical advances and computing power for simulation. Simulation methods: molecular dynamics, Monte Carlo methods, ab-initio methods (density functional theory). Analysis methods: cluster and defect identification, visualization methods.

 

Website: dutsm183.stm.tudelft.nl/fcm

 

Cooperation and relation to research elsewhere:

Research school: None

Other: Philips Research, Philips Semiconductors, Shell Research, TNO-TPD, FOM, Los Alamos National Laboratory, NIST (Washingtion DC), Princeton University, TU Wien, IRI, TU Eindhoven, Un. Leiden.

 

Other main research themes ("speerpunten") in which the group intends to participate:

Materials Science.

 

Computer resources employed:

32-node Beowulf cluster (in-house), Cray(HPAC/TUD), Teras (SARA).

 

Contributions to BSc and MSc curricula:

Participation in 2 courses on atomistic modeling in intended MSc program in Computational Science and Engineering (planned in conjunction with Leiden Un.), participation in 2 courses on atomistic modeling and materials theory in MSc program in Materials Science and Engineering (planned in conjunction with Leiden Un.).

 

Duration of the program: indefinite

 


Research input realized in 1995-2000, total:

Permanent staff: 1 fte;

temporary staff, internal funding: 3 fte;

temporary staff, external funding: 5 fte;

Equipment, external funding: 400 kEuro, internal funding: 20 kEuro/year

 

Research input foreseen in 2001-2010, per year:

Permanent staff: 1 fte;

temporary staff, internal funding: 1 fte; equipment: 40

kEuro/year; temporary staff, external funding: 1 fte; equipment: 200kEuro/year.